The Straight Edge Culture

The subculture that I have chosen to talk about between 1955 – 2000 is the Straight Edge Culture.

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WHAT IS STRAIGHT EDGE?

It is a subculture centred on hardcore punk music.

People who are straight edge do not smoke, do drugs or consume alcohol.

It was a direct reaction to the sexual revolution, hedonism, and excess associated with punk rock.

The term was coined by the 1980s hardcore punk band Minor Threat in their song “Straight Edge”.

 

ORIGIN: 1970S AND EARLY 1980S

Straight edge grew out of the hardcore punk in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and was partly characterized by shouted rather than sung vocals.

Straight edge individuals of this early era often associated with the original punk ideals such as individualism, disdain for work and school, and live-for-the-moment attitudes.

 

STRAIGHT EDGE BANDS

Here is a list of some straight edge band:

The Modern Lovers (1981)

The Teen Idols (1979)

Minor Threat (1980)

7 Seconds (1980)

Youth Brigade (1981)

Gorilla Biscuits (1987)

Anti-Flag (1988)

 

THE “X” SYMBOL

The letter X is the most known symbol of straight edge, and is sometimes worn as a marking on the back of both hands, though it can be displayed on other body parts as well. Some followers of straight edge have also incorporated the symbol into clothing and pins.

Later bands have used the X symbol on album covers and other paraphernalia in a variety of ways. The cover of No Apologies by Judge shows two crossed gavels in the X symbol. Other objects that have been used include shovels, baseball bats, and hockey sticks.

 

STRAIGHT EDGE IN MODERN SOCIETY

CM Punk is the only Straight Edge World Champion in professional wrestling.

He does promos in the ring and says he is ‘better than everyone else’ because of his lifestyle.

He also formed a stable called ’The Straight Edge Society’ and used the motto “I Will Save You”.

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